Tips for Choosing the Right Prenatal Class – Part 1 of 2

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Posted by vera | Posted in Birth, Nannies, Parenting, Triplets, Twins or Multiple Birth Pregnancy | Posted on 03-09-2013

PPL_logoThanks to Alba Aguanno, RN, BScN, LCCE and Director of Childbirth Education at Port Perry Lamaze for inspiring and contributing to this blog post on the important topic of choosing the best prenatal class for you!

Expectant parents sometimes wonder if they should take childbirth classes at all. With a range of childbirth education options available, choosing the right class can be confusing, especially for those expecting twins or triplets!

Here are some tips to consider when choosing a childbirth preparation class.

1. Credentials

certificateFirst, inquire about the credentials of your potential instructor. Some have formal medical training or educational certification, while others have none. Are they health professionals (registered nurse, physiotherapist, medical doctor, chiropractor, or midwife), or do they have considerable experience with expectant parents and newborns?

Have they completed a recognized, formal course on childbirth education or education in general: Lamaze International certification (LCCE), International Childbirth Education Association (ICEA), Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association – Childbirth Educator (CBE), Childbirth International (Dip CBEd), or Ontario College of Teachers (OCT) or a Masters in Education (M.Ed.) with an emphasis on early learning and/or adult education?

The Lamaze-Certified Childbirth Educator (LCCE) credential is the most widely-recognized and respected qualification in this field. It is the only childbirth education credential accredited by the U.S. National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA), a government body ensuring quality in certification programs.

Certification doesn’t necessarily ensure an ideal learning experience, but it can certainly inspire expectant parents’ confidence that they are getting the most current and correct information.

2. Experience

Consider the instructor’s years of childbirth education experience: If they have been doing this a long time, they may offer a wealth of experience, but they may also be “burnt out”. Conversely, a newer instructor may be enthusiastic, but a little too “textbook”, lacking extensive real-life experience with twins, triplets and their parents.

Also, consider the amount of experience in other class content areas such as breastfeeding and early parenting support, especially with multiple births families. The last thing you need as an expectant parent is a child birth educator who has little or no experience with twins, triplets and quads.

3. Testimonials/Recommendations

handshakeDoes the potential instructor publish testimonials and endorsements for their classes? Read the feedback carefully to get a better picture of what past participants have thought of the classes.

Also, consider who is recommending the class. Have you found it on your own, were you recommended by a friend who heard about it or who took the course, or were you recommended by your obstetrician, family doctor, or midwife?

Many providers will collect endorsements from past students, and will publish at least a few of these on their website. If not, ask to see some, or speak to someone else to see what they thought of the class or instructor.

4. Location & Class Size


all-four-300x199Ask where (specifically) the classes will be taught.

Educators teach in a variety of environments. Some teach in hospital classrooms or medical offices, while others teach in community centres; some even teach in their homes or yours! Increasingly, prenatal classes are offered online, even prenatal classes for twins and triplets. Be sure to check the other tips before enrolling in an online class.

Some providers keep their class sizes small to maintain the quality of instruction and to facilitate meaningful interactions with participants. In certain cases, private classes may be offered. This can be ideal if you are in a remote part of town, where there are no other couples expecting twins or triplets, and you don’t want to be the class circus side show with unique prenatal issues particular to your multiples pregnancy.

There can be a lot to think about when deciding to enroll in prenatal classes, but for families expecting twins, triplets or more, the decision is among the first steps to a healthy twins pregnancy, labour and delivery.

More tips coming in Part 2… stay tuned! 

Comments (1)

[…] Our previous blog post, by  Alba Aguanno, RN, BScN, LCCE and Director of Childbirth Education at Port Perry Lamaze investigated how best to consider credentials and more when choosing the best twins prenatal class for you – here are four more tips on choosing a multiple births prenatal class.  Thanks, Alba! […]

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